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Dedicated Portable Generator Circuit - Off the grid

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  • Dedicated Portable Generator Circuit - Off the grid

    Originally posted 11-07-2017 1:50 PM
    By: jpkelly


    Here in Rochester, NY I'd like to create an dedicated standalone portable generator circuit that would only be used to power our furnace and refrigerator in case of a power failure. It would be "off the grid", not connected to any existing home wiring. No transfer switch, none of that.

    I have a Reliance 30 amp 4-wire L14-30 style power inlet, two 30A duplex outlets to mount, one near the furnace, one near the refrigerator. I have a coil of 10/2 solid Romex cable and a Reliance 10 gauge, 4 prong 30 amp twist lock generator cord. The twist lock generator cord will be plugged into the 120/220V generator outlet, however I only want 120V. My question is:

    Using the 10/2 Romex what is the correct wiring to just have 120V current? In other words what do I match with the four connectors on the power inlet box?
    Best Wishes and thank you for your patience!

  • #2
    Originally posted 11-07-2017 4:05 PM

    You should install a small panel. Feed that with the 120/240 from the generator and then add 15amp breakers and #14 cable to feed your circuits.

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    • #3
      Originally posted 11-07-2017 6:10 PM
      By: jpkelly


      Originally posted by chrisb
      You should install a small panel. Feed that with the 120/240 from the generator and then add 15amp breakers and #14 cable to feed your circuits.
      Makes sense. I guess my 10/2 is out of the question, huh?

      Thank you!

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      • #4
        Originally posted 11-07-2017 6:15 PM

        You cannot put 15 or 20 amp receptacles on a 30A circuit, nor can a hard wired furnace have a supply rated more than 150% of the nameplate amps (exception being a 20A circuit is allowed even if the furnace only draws 3 amps).

        Does your generator have a 14-20 output? That would simplify things as you'd have a 20A overcurrent device upstream of the 15/20A receptacles. Do that and you don't need a panel.

        You only need 12-2 wire. You can use 10-2, but it is harder to fit into boxes and harder to wrap around outlet screws.

        Your cord may have letters by the prongs such as X, Y, N, and G. You put the two bare grounds to the G terminal. The two white neutrals go to the N terminal (and you must run 1 wire from the inlet N terminal and wire nut it to the other 2 whites -- if this splice fails you'll get wacky voltages on your circuit and could burn things up). One black goes to X. The other black goes to Y. You generator, being 120/240V, has 2 separate 120V windings with the neutral being common. Best to load both windings and not put all the load on one with the other unloaded.
        Mark
        Kent, WA

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        • #5
          Add a Solar Panel and feed it from a generator and then add cables and breakers to circuits. I personally have a Kohler Generator and it works fine.

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