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Grounding ungrounded wiring
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Grounding ungrounded wiring

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Grounding ungrounded wiring
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Wiring Information for the Do It Yourself Homeowner

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Thread: Grounding ungrounded wiring

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default Grounding ungrounded wiring

    I am replacing all the switches and outlets in the home, as they showing their age, and you simply cannot buy 2 prong outlets anymore.

    So I want to add a ground wire to all outlets in a three bed room home this is a complete rehab. I intend to take ground back to main panel is it permissible to take new ground in and out of as many outlets as practical do I need to keep each circuit separate? the new ground wire will not follow the path of the existing 12/2. It looks like it is copper wiring so there is no aluminum concerns. Is there a limit in this type of situation on many outlets a ground wire can service?

    Also because it is an older home the kitchen does not have the modern day safety features such as gfi's, it is likely under serviced compared to the newer kitchens.

    I do not think I have the budget this year to do an absolute rewire perhaps in a couple of years I can do that, but how can I go about at least updating some things that will not require me to re-mortgage the home.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Oh I forget if makes any difference I live in the Oklahoma

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    215

    Default

    I believe you could use one long wire if you want, and split it out as many times as necessary at a switch, light, or outlet box. Ideally, that wire would go through a knockout clamp that has the power wires too if the box is metal. The code requires that the wire go back to the panel or ground electrode system. There is no prohibition on splicing onto it, but the splices must be like any other splice: accessible in a box, and use a listed splicing device like a wire nut.

    If you have a mix of 15 and 20 amp circuits, just use a #12 ground. That one wire could ground every circuit in the house that is 15A or 20A. A 30A to 60A circuit will require a #10 ground. That is getting fat and harder to deal with in boxes, so best to run one of those and pickup the dryer, range, water heater, etc.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    398

    Default

    Just my opinon but if you can run a ground wire why not run a new cable with a ground wire and be done with it.
    Operation Overlord.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Lala land, OH
    Posts
    235

    Default

    2 prong ungrounded outlets are still available for this exact purpose. They are not cheap compared to regular 3 prong outlets though.
    for example: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Leviton-1...0356969?N=12kx
    Check around and at supply houses for better deals on odd items like these.

    If you doing this for shock protection you can install a GFI at the first outlet of the circuit (provided it doesnt branch off before the first outlet, if your house is from the 40's or older, you may be out of luck). You then can install 3 prong outlets on the circuit but you must use the "no equipment ground" stickers. This will give you potentially better protection then a ground wire will. A ground wire will not save you if you complete the circuit from hot to ground or something that is grounded, a GFI will (in most cases)

    If you have electronics that need a ground for noise/interference control, you are best running a ground.

    If your plug does not have a ground then running a ground will not help anything.

    I agree with Chrisb, if you are going through this much trouble, why not do it right the first time? You can redo the circuits that need it now and just replace outlets with the above item in rooms that have no grounds needed, then rewire those rooms when it's in the budget.
    Last edited by Mr T; 06-29-2013 at 01:49 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I had a couple of instances where the cord to the tv just came out on its own which means the contacts are no longer griping properly which is not good. Someone suggestion I have the house checked for possible asbestos tiles, I do not think there is but I should have it checked anyway before disturbing everything in a house rewire.

    then the newer range outlets are different then the old one that I have which means I would have to change the range cord or simply buy a new cooking range which is likely due anyway.

    I figured I could run a single 12 gage green wire easier than running a new cable, as a single ground wire may be able to run under a edge of a trip at the bottom of the wall as opposed to properly running a new electrical cable. Plus I wanted to change the electrical panel from fuses to breakers at the same time when the house got completely rewired.

    Thank you Mr. T for pointing out the existence of new 2 prong outlets that alone would solve the outlet issues that do not grip properly.

    So the quick fix for the aging part is just to replace the existing 2 prong to new 2 prong, change the switches, perhaps ground the one outlet that the computer is on, and within a couple of years redo everything, and hope I am right (this I really think I am) that there is no asbestos in the home to deal with at the same time.

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