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Thread: Basement Spare Bedroom

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default Basement Spare Bedroom

    I am putting in a spare bedroom in the basement, along with an lot of computer equipment close by in the next room in the basement.

    I was thinking of running a single 20 amp circuit there or should I stick with a couple of 15 amp circuits?, I also read somewhere that arc breakers are now required for bedrooms is that correct? Live on the west coast near Seattle. I am sort of weary of these devices false triggering with so much computer equipment on it, one system being a video editing system, I suppose ups on the computers would solve some of that concern using arc circuits but I would rather not have to deal with any false triggers.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    216

    Default

    I'd run a 20A circuit to the room/outlet with the computers. Then run a 15A or 20A to the bedroom. You need AFCI's in bedroom circuits. Washington hasn't adopted the 2011 NEC but will take the 2014 NEC when it comes out (but your area may have its own version of the code -- Seattle and some cities have their own addendums different from the state adopted WAC rules). So any circuit that powers one light, receptacle, or other outlet in a bedroom must be AFCI. I've never had my AFCI's trip and I don't think computers or video equipment are going to have problems. Variable Frequency Drives and some lighting controllers can have issues.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    398

    Default

    You should add your location to your profile.
    If you are in Canada lighting can only be on 15 amp circuits so you would need at least one 15 amp for lighting.
    Since a bedroom is involved don't forget about the smokes. If you have hard wired smokes now you will need to tap into that circuit.
    I think the computer area should have its own circuit. Unless it is going to be some sort of server farm have a large laser printer a 15 amp circuit should be fine.
    Operation Overlord.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Welland, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    48

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patfrank View Post
    Live on the west coast near Seattle.

    Can't offer any specific code advice for Seattle, but one thing to consider is that there may be an “exception” to the AFCI rule if the receptacle is for a specific device. As an example, in Canada receptacles dedicated for medical equipment, air conditioning or heating loads and are not part of the electrical design for the “general use” receptacles are exempt from the AFCI rule in the code. Similar rules apply for GFCI receptacles/circuits.

    Cheers

    John
    John Kuehnl-Cadwell
    Master Electrician
    Datawise Solutions Inc
    www.datawisesolutions.ca

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thanks for all the replies.

    Navguy I can understand the reasoning for exemptions for places such as hospital or any medical / air conditioning and heating because of the damage (or life issue in the case medical equipment) it could do if it shut down accidently. I am not sure I could get an exemption for non medical equipment in a bedroom area, but may be interesting exactly what is exempt.

    chrisb we are near Seattle Washington in the Untied States south of the Canadian border (but not that far), although it never crossed my mind about the smoke detectors, there is one there in the basement but closer to the other end of the basement not right at the proposed bedroom or computer area should another one be installed closer to that area? I am also considering installing a co2 / gas detector down there too.

    suemarkp I think your idea is good, I was just trying to cut costs by only having to buy one breaker, and one wire run to the area but I think it would be best to go with the two circuits, that way I can have the bedroom itself on an arc, and the computer area just outside the bedroom on a circuit without an arc. Although I do hit save frequently I am still paranoid about having to back track work when the circuit shuts down unexpectedly, although a utility brown out would cause the same issue, so I guess a good ups is also in order.
    Last edited by patfrank; 05-25-2013 at 09:15 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    216

    Default

    The NEC doesn't have much in the way of exceptions for Arc Fault breakers. But the WAC contain the Washington mods to the NEC requirements:

    (4) NEC 210.12(B) is amended to require AFCI protection only for dwelling unit bedroom spaces.
    (a) Dwelling Unit Bedroom spaces include spaces that:
    (i) Are used as the bedroom;
    (ii) Are accessed only through the bedroom;
    (iii) Are ancillary to the bedroom's function (e.g. closets, sitting areas, etc.);
    (iv) Contain branch circuits that supply 125-volt, 15 and 20 ampere outlets; and
    (v) Are not bathrooms.
    (b) If a new circuit (s) is added in an existing dwelling unit bedroom, an existing outlet(s) that is not connected to the new circuit(s) does not require arc-fault circuit interrupter protection if the outlet(s) was installed before December 1, 2005.
    (c) If an existing circuit, installed before December 1, 2005, is extended, arc-fault circuit interrupter protection is not required.
    (d) Arc-fault circuit interrupter protection is not required to be used for smoke or fire alarm outlets.


    You can read WAC 296-46B here: http://www.lni.wa.gov/FormPub/Detail.asp?DocID=2360

    When you sell a house in WA now, it must have a CO detector in all required locations (one per floor within 15' I think of bedrooms). Bedrooms require smoke detection, so you'll need to add that and tie it in to the other if you have wired smokes.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    6

    Default

    You do not need to worry about it. It is almost right to have a 15 amp circuit in your bedroom for light. But, Always remember the circuit must not be over loaded at anytime.If you are thinking about a simple lighting purpose then it is OK.
    Last edited by Alec; 11-22-2013 at 01:41 AM.

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