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Power to whirlpool bath
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Power to whirlpool bath

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Power to whirlpool bath
Residential Wiring - The Right Way!

Wiring Information for the Do It Yourself Homeowner

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Thread: Power to whirlpool bath

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    414

    Default Power to whirlpool bath

    I want to change the regular standard size bathtub to a whirlpool but still of the standard size bathtub, have to change a sheet or two of drywall on the ceiling on the first floor because a few months ago the sink over flowed briefly in the upstairs sink causing some ceiling drywall damage and figured if we ran a new wire to the bathroom it would be easy with the ceiling drywall was replaced on st floor, but what are the power requirements and wire size needed to power a new whirlpool bathtub? live in Ontario Canada
    Donald Kerr
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    405

    Default

    Those would be totally dependent on the tub specs. You do need to leave access to them though.
    I don't know of any dedicated requirements unless the tub specifies that.
    If you are contemplating one with a heater I think I would consider running a dedicates #12 line to the panel. You can always hook it to a 15 amp circuit, but you can't hook a #14 to a 20 amp circuit if that's what the tub calls for.
    We do NOT have dedicated bathroom circuit requirements like they do in the USA. Bathroom can be on any regular household circuit as long as you don't exceed the 12 outlet rule.

    Bottom line tub specs are going to determine what you need.
    Operation Overlord.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    414

    Default

    I will take a look around as I have not bought a replacement bathtub yet, but I assume it requires GFI circuit. The existing GFI outlet is tied to the downstairs bathroom on the same circuit and there has been issues in the past when something was being used on both floors in both bathrooms, so it better be on separate circuit
    Donald Kerr
    Author and Creator of...
    http://www.wiringdoneright.com
    Don't Let Your House go up in Flames
    Get It Right the First Time!

    http://www.ez-forums.com
    Got Questions? Get Answers!!
    Ask our Team of Experts

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    405

    Default

    ESA has a good FAQ site.

    ESA FAQ site


    Here is one FAQ that may be relevant.

    Question
    What are the Code rules regarding electrical outlets and equipment near hot tubs?
    Answer

    All electrical equipment (eg - receptacles, lighting, heating, pumps, air conditioning equipment, etc) located within 3 m of the inside walls of the tub and not suitably separated from the tub by a fence, wall, or other permanent barrier shall be GFCI protected.

    Receptacles are not permitted to be located within 1.5 m of the tub.

    A Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter shall not be located with 3 m of a spa or hot tub, unless the GFCI is an integral part of an approved factory built spa or hot tub, or is located behind a barrier that will prevent the occupant of the tub from contacting the device.

    Rule 68-068.

    Ontario Electrical Safety Code 25th Edition/2012
    Operation Overlord.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Welland Ontario
    Posts
    405

    Default

    They also have a place where you can ask specific questions. Last time I asked it took a while but they did answer.


    http://www.esasafe.com/
    Operation Overlord.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    219

    Default

    Tubs can be surprising power hogs. It will depend on what all they have inside them. We just put one in that has a pump, air blower, and heater. It requires a 20A circuit and a 15A circuit. Basically, the pump and blower fit on the 20A, and the heater on the 15A. I think each item draws around 8 amps.

    I would run at minimum a dedicated #12/20A circuit for a tub install. Having a second circuit close could help in the case where 20A is not enough. I also like the heater. You can't fill our tub without running out of hot water, so it isn't real hot to start with. Having the heater lets you sit in a nice warm tub as long as you want.
    Mark
    Kent, WA

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