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Appliance tip of the week...

Appliance tip of the week...

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Thread: Appliance tip of the week...

  1. #1
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    Default Appliance tip of the week...

    Appliance tip of the week...

    A new study released today by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) demonstrates that readily available technology can dramatically reduce deadly carbon monoxide (CO) emission rates from certain common portable gasoline-powered generators. The technology can provide additional critical time for consumers to recognize and escape from the deadly hazard of carbon monoxide poisoning. With the adaptation of existing emission control technology, CO rates can be lowered to levels that would save lives. On average, carbon monoxide from portable gasoline-powered generators kills more than 70 people every year.

    CPSC staff's study outlined one method to reduce the generator engine's CO emission rate by using closed-loop electronic fuel injection and a small catalyst-the same emission control technology used on motor scooters and small motorcycles. This significantly increased the predicted escape time by twelve times the current time-from eight minutes to 96 minutes-for the deadly scenario when a consumer is in their garage while they are running their generator there. CPSC's study also showed that the predicted escape time for those consumers inside the house, as opposed to the garage, was even greater.

    The escape time is the time between onset of obvious symptoms and incapacitation.

    The CPSC continues to urge consumers to never run their portable generators in their attached garages, in or even near their houses, including avoiding placement outside near windows or vents. Generators should only be used outside, far away from homes. CPSC cautions that even if portable gasoline-powered generators were to incorporate this technology, they would still need to be used outside, far from the home. The technology does not make them safe for indoor use.

    Another important line of defense against CO poisoning is having CO alarms on each level of the home and outside sleeping areas. Based on available alarm data 93 percent of CO-related deaths involving generators take place in homes with no CO alarms. Much like smoke alarms are designed to alert consumers about smoke or fires, CO alarms are designed to alert consumers to dangerous CO levels and give them time to get out of the house before becoming incapacitated. Deaths involving portable generators have been on the rise since 1999 when generators became widely available to consumers. There have been at least 755 CO deaths involving generators from 1999 through 2011. While reporting of incidents for 2011 is ongoing, there were at least 73 CO related deaths involving generators last year.

    Generators are responsible for the largest number of estimated non-fire CO deaths associated with consumer products. From 2006 through 2008, generators accounted for 43 percent of CO deaths compared to 33 percent for heating systems, such as furnaces. Furnaces had historically been responsible for the most CO deaths. Generators are used by consumers to keep lights, electrical appliances or heating and cooling units running in their homes during power outages. Incapacitation or death can occur within minutes if consumers use a generator inside a home, garage, shed or use it outside near windows or vents, because dangerous levels of CO from a generator's fuel-burning engine build up quickly.

    With the release of this study, CPSC is urging manufacturers to voluntarily adopt a stringent CO emission standard for engines used in portable gasoline-powered generators with the expectation that it will improve safety and save lives, just as the marine industry did in 2005. That year, manufacturers of small marine generator engines, voluntarily adopted a stringent CO emission standard to address the hazard of acute poisoning that was causing fatal and serious injuries to boaters exposed to marine generator engine exhaust.

    First Alert CO400 Battery Powered Carbon Monoxide Alarm

    Kidde KN-COEG-3 Nighthawk Plug-In Carbon Monoxide and Explosive Gas Alarm with Battery Backup

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:44 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  2. #2
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    Default GE and Hotpoint refrigerators

    Appliance tip of the week...

    The newer GE and Hotpoint refrigerators? the ones with the motherboard on the back? use thermistors to sense temperature in the freezer, fresh food compartment, and evaporator. The motherboard on the back of the refrigerator sends an electrical pulse to the sensor to measure its change in resistance and thus sense the change in temperature of the refrigerated space. The older thermistors had a defective seal which allowed water to seep in.

    This messes with the resistance and sends weird signals to the motherboard resulting in erratic temperature control.

    If you?re having temperature control problems in your GE fridge, check to see if you have the old-style thermistors. If you do, you should replace all of them. Most models ( not all ) have four: two in the fresh food section, one in the freezer, and one mounted directly on the evaporator.

    Appliance tip of the week...-gethermstor-jpg

    Appliance tip of the week...-thermistor-wr55x10025-00855831-jpg

    Temperature sensor (thermistor) Manufacturer Number WR55X10025

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:43 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  3. #3
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    Default Clothes Dryers / Fires

    Appliance tip of the week...

    Did you know that every year, clothes dryers cause thousands of major residential fires in the U.S.?

    What's the primary culprit? Lint. Dryer venting can become clogged with lint, causing a dangerous buildup of heat and an instant fire that spreads fast.

    Here are three ways you can keep your family and your home safe:

    1. Clean out dryer venting at least once per year

    A venting system should be cleaned out from inside of the dryer to the outside vent cap at least once per year. Professionals can be hired for this or you can purchase a Short brush or long brush to do it on your own and save money. We also recommend Lint Alert, which monitors for lint build-up and blockage in gas dryers and alerts homeowners if there is a fire risk.

    Warning Signs Pay attention to drying time.

    If it's taking longer for clothes to dry, it's likely that lint is clogging the venting system. You should clean it out as soon as possible. Waiting to do this will threaten safety.

    2. White vinyl venting should be replaced immediately with an aluminum one.

    White vinyl no longer meets national fire code standards in the U.S., as it is considered highly flammable. Aluminum venting may be purchased at any hardware store.

    3. Clean out your dryer's lint screen after every load.

    Dryer lint screens should be cleaned out after every load. For extra precaution, homeowners can use a bristled brush to remove stubborn pieces of lint and pieces that collect in the screen's housing. A screen with tears should be replaced immediately.



    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:46 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  4. #4
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    Default Moving the Refridgerator

    Appliance tip of the week...
    Moving Refrigerator On It's Side
    Q - Can a fridge be placed on it's side to be moved...Yes and No!!??

    A - A fridge can be moved on it's side, but you run the risk of some of the oil coming out of the compressor and running up the lines to places where it can cause a restriction. Damage can occur to the fridge and the fridge may stop cooling :-(

    Many times there is just no other way to move your fridge other than on it's side. Appliance Repair Aid has some tips for you.

    The #1 problem with a fridge on it's side is the oil comes out of the compressor and runs up the cooling lines. If at all possible lay the fridge down on the opposite side of where these tubes come out of the compressor. Oil can run up the return line and discharge line, oil in the process tube will not hurt the fridge or operation. The worst is having oil in the discharge line. See picture below for a description of the different lines on a compressor...

    Attachment 59

    As you can see laying this fridge on it's left side ( facing from the back ) would be best ( on this particular fridge ) as the discharge and return lines would be up and no oil can enter the lines.

    If you have no choice and must to lay the refrigerator down, a box or something under the top part of the fridge propping the top to be higher than the bottom ( when you lay it down ) would also help keep the oil in compressor.

    When you get the fridge to the location you want it....keep the fridge in the up-rite position for at least the same amount of time that the refrigerator was laying down to help any oil in the lines to drain back into the compressor before plugging it back in...after the few hours are over, then plug it in and have a cold drink :-)

    Don't forget to tape the shelves down inside the fridge and also to tape the doors closed when you attempt to move your refrigerator.

    Attachment 60
    Forearm lifting straps, Part# 20001096

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:47 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  5. #5
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    Default Bake Times

    Appliance tip of the week...

    Several factors can affect bake times and browning. As cooking appliances get older, it is not uncommon for the oven temperature to shift.

    As a result, it is natural to gradually adapt cooking times, temperatures and habits to that change. Then, when baking in a new oven with proper temperature calibration, results may not be as expected.

    An easy way to check if the range or wall oven is operating properly is to bake a standard box white cake mix. Following the package directions and baking times should provide a cake that is done and evenly browned.

    Pan Selection and Placement

    Dark pans absorb heat that results in a browner, crispier crust. These types of pans are commonly used for pies and breads. It may be necessary to reduce the oven temperature 25? F. for good results if baking cakes, cookies, etc. Shiny pans reflect heat which results in lighter, more delicate browning. Cakes and cookies require this type of pan. Glass pans absorb heat slowly but hold it well. When glass pans are used for baking, lower the recommended temperature by 25? F. However, this is not required for pies and casseroles.

    Incorrect Rack Position in Oven

    For single rack baking, centre the rack so the food is in the middle of the oven. For multiple rack baking, check the User's Guide for recommendations. If food is placed on a rack toward the top of the oven, top browning may be too dark. If food is placed on a rack located near the bottom of the oven, the food may be too dark on the bottom.

    Incorrect Pan Placement on the Rack

    Allow 1-2 inches of space around each pan and between pans and the oven walls. Placement of the pans should not interfere with airflow. If baking on more than one rack, place the pans so that one is not directly over another except when baking cookies using convection bake.

    Other Tips

    Preheating is necessary for baked goods such as breads, cookies and cakes. It is not necessary for casseroles, meat, etc. To preheat, set the oven to the recommended baking temperature, not higher. For ovens without an indicator light or signal allow 10-15 minutes for preheating.

    Most recipes provide minimum and maximum baking times such as "bake 35 to 45 minutes." Do not open the oven door to check until the minimum time has elapsed. Oven "peeking" drops the temperature approximately 25-30? F. each time. This wastes energy and can increase baking times.

    If you need to check on foods in the oven, look through the window (if equipped) in the oven door rather than opening the door.

    Aluminum foil should NOT be placed on the bottom of the oven or completely cover an oven rack. It will block the air flow and transfer of heat. If foil is used to catch spillovers from pies and casseroles, place a piece that is slightly larger than the cooking utensil on the rack directly below the rack with the food.

    Frigidaire Gallery FGEF306TMW 30" Freestanding Electric Double Oven Range with 5 Radiant Elements, SpaceWise Expandable Elements, 7.0 cu. ft. Double Symmetry Oven

    Frigidaire Gallery FGEF306TMB 30" Freestanding Electric Double Oven Range with 5 Radiant Elements, SpaceWise Expandable Elements, 7.0 cu. ft. Double Symmetry Oven

    Frigidaire Gallery FGEF306TMF 30" Freestanding Electric Double Oven Range with 5 Radiant Elements, SpaceWise Expandable Elements, 7.0 cu. ft. Double Symmetry Oven

    Appliance tip of the week...-fgef306tmf_feature-jpg

    How it works

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:49 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  6. #6
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    Default Parts Person

    Appliance tip of the week...
    Lament of a Parts Person

    I work behind the counter of a parts and accessories store. Sometimes I'm called the genius; sometimes I'm called lots more.

    I'm just a simple parts person but when a job goes sick, the experts come to me and ask, "What makes this darn thing tick?"

    I'm supposed to know the numbers of tubes and bolts and gears, on every product that's been made for more than forty years.

    Mind-reader and magician, and handyman as well. I'm supposed to be an Edison plus Alexander Bell.

    But life would be a pleasure and I'd smile from ear to ear, if people just would tell me the MODEL, MAKE and YEAR!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    If your cooking appliances have been acting up, look into getting them repaired well in advance of the holidays.

    Some common components may be in short supply in peak seasons, leaving you eating out or ordering in during those family holiday times!.

    Rachel Ray Store

    Appliance tip of the week...-burner-drip-bowl-kit-w10291024-01411036-jpg Drip pan kit

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:50 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  7. #7
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    Default Cook Turkey

    So it's the holidays, and you're responsible for the main dish. Don't worry; you're only five steps away from serving the perfect bird at your big feast. Read on to learn how to cook a turkey.

    Step 1: Thaw it. If using a frozen turkey, thaw in its original plastic wrapper in the fridge. Allow for five hours per pound, or per 500 g.

    Quicker method: Cover the turkey with cold water (the sink is a good place for this), and change with fresh cold water every 30 minutes; allow one hour per pound (500 g).

    Step 2: Season it. Prepare the turkey by removing giblets and neck. Rinse and wipe the cavity; sprinkle with salt and pepper or stuff lightly using skewers to fasten skin over the cavity.

    Step 3: Roast it. Place turkey, breast side up, on rack in roasting pan. Brush with melted butter or oil. Tent loosely with foil. Roast in 325?F (160?C) oven for about 20 minutes per pound (500 g) or until juices run clear when turkey is pierced and when thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 180?F (82?C) for a stuffed turkey or 170?F (77?C) for an unstuffed turkey. Remove tent for last hour of roasting.

    Step 4: Cover and leave it. When turkey is done, transfer to warm platter. Tent with foil and let stand for 20 to 30 minutes. This allows time for juices at the surface of the bird to distribute evenly throughout the meat.

    Step 5: Carve turkey. Eat and enjoy!

    Black Friday Preview
    Fast appliance replacement for disaster areas

    jeff.
    Last edited by dkerr; 04-16-2013 at 01:51 PM.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  8. #8
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    Default

    Appliance tip of the week...
    Although you are not working directly with any electrical wires, it is a good safe practice to disconnect the power. Fill the kitchen sink with warm soapy water, just as if you were preparing to wash dishes.

    Open the refrigerator door and remove the contents from the unit. This is a good time to throw out any old food and containers that have been forgotten. If your refrigerator smells bad, identify the foods causing the odor and throw them away. Most often the foul smell is coming from expired dairy products or spoiled produce. Repeat the process for the freezer.

    Pull out the shelves and drawers. Wash them in the sink of soapy water, and rinse with warm water. Place drawers upside down over dish towels and set racks on end in a dish drainer to dry while you continue cleaning the refrigerator.

    Fill a cleaning bucket with 2 tbsp. of baking soda and 1 gallon of warm water. Dip a rag in the baking soda water and wipe down the walls of the refrigerator. Wipe the inside door panels and the bottom of the refrigerator. If necessary soak the bottom of the refrigerator with some baking soda water to soften stains and stuck foods. Wipe clean with a dry towel. Clean the freezer in the same manner.

    Wash the outside of the refrigerator and the door gaskets with a rag dipped in the dish water. Wipe the gaskets and outside of the refrigerator dry with a towel.

    Dry the shelves and drawers with a towel if they are still wet. Insert them back into the refrigerator. Place the contents back into the refrigerator, wiping down any jars and containers that might have spills on them. Plug the power cord back into the wall outlet.

    Appliance tip of the week...-fridge-aid-deodorizer-78956-jpg Fridge Aid refrigerator deodorizer

    Appliance tip of the week...-freezer-deodorizer-4392894srb-01181528-jpg Deodorizer Specifically for your freezer. Keeps ice tasting fresh

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

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