Appliance tip of the week...Opposite issues...oven won't turn off and oven won't turn on.

Most Frequent Causes for Oven won't turn off.

Temperature Control Thermostat

The temperature control thermostat monitors the temperature inside the oven and cycles on the heat when the oven temperature gets too low. If the temperature control thermostat fails, the oven won’t heat. However, this is not very common. Before replacing the oven thermostat, first check more commonly defective components—specifically the igniter and the bake and broil elements. If these components are not defective, the temperature control thermostat might be at fault. The temperature control thermostat cannot easily be tested. If you suspect the thermostat is defective, replace it.

Oven Control Board

The oven control board has relays that send voltage to the bake and broil circuits according to the user settings and sensor input. If one of the control board relays shorts closed, the control board may send continuous voltage to the heating circuit. If the oven continues to heat after it is turned off, the control board is likely defective. If the control board is defective, replace it.

Bake Element

Sometimes, if the heating element burns out, it can short out to the inside of the oven. If the heating element has shorted out, the oven will not turn off. Often, if the bake element has shorted out, it will be visibly damaged. Inspect the heating element for holes or blisters. To determine if the bake element has shorted out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the bake element does not have continuity, replace it.

Broil Element

If the broil element is shorted out, the oven may not turn off. Often, if the element has shorted out, it will be visibly damaged. Inspect the broil element for holes or blisters. To determine if the broil element is shorted out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the broil element shows continuity from the terminals to the outer case, this indicates that it is shorted out. If the broil element is shorted out, replace it.

Relay Board

Some ovens are equipped with a relay board. The relay board has several relays which control the voltage to the heating element. If one or more of these relays fails, the relay board might send continuous voltage to the heating element. If the relay board is defective, replace it.

Appliance Parts

Most Frequent Causes for Oven won't turn on.

Bake Element

When the bake element is heating properly, it glows red hot. If the element does not glow red, this indicates that the element is not heating. Often, if the heating element has burned out, it will be visibly damaged. Inspect the heating element for holes or blisters. To determine if the bake element has burned out, use a multimeter to test the element for continuity. If the bake element does not have continuity, replace it.

Igniter

The igniter is the most commonly defective part for a gas oven that won't turn on. The igniter has two main functions. First, the igniter draws electrical current through the oven safety valve to open it. Second, the igniter gets hot enough to glow and ignite the gas in the burner assembly. If the igniter gets weak, it will fail to open the safety valve correctly. If the valve does not open, the oven will not heat. To determine if the igniter is defective, observe the igniter when the oven is on. If the igniter glows for more than 90 seconds without igniting the gas flame, this indicates that the igniter is too weak to open the valve. If the igniter is weak, replace it. If the igniter does not glow at all, use a multimeter to test the igniter for continuity. If the igniter does not have continuity, replace it.

Bake or Broil Spark Electrode

For bake & broil burner ignition an oven burner spark electrode is used to ignite the gas. The electrode is a device that sits right next to the burner. It functions like a spark plug. As power is applied to it a spark jumps from the spark electrode tip to the to the electrode shield, igniting the gas. If the electrode is broken or worn out the spark may not occur. Visually inspect the electrode assembly for cracks in the porcelain housing or damage to the electrode tip itself. Be aware that a proper ground and the correct polarity of the incoming voltage to the range is necessary for the electrode control to sense the presence of a flame once the burner is ignited. If the burner goes off after ignition check for proper ground and the correct polarity at the wall outlet.

Incoming Power Problem

Electric ovens require 240 volts of alternating current. Gas ovens require 120 volts. If an oven won't turn on there could be an incoming power problem. To determine if the electrical outlet is providing sufficient voltage, use a multimeter to test the incoming power at the wall socket.

Oven Control Board

The oven control board has relays that send voltage to the bake and broil circuits according to the user settings and sensor input. If the control board is defective, it may not send voltage to the heating components. However, this is rarely the case. Before replacing the control board, first test all of the heating components. If you determine that all of the heating components are working properly, replace the oven control board. Since it’s not easy to test the oven control board, you will have to replace the control board if you suspect it is defective.

Appliance Parts

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