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Moffat Range requires excorcism

Moffat Range requires excorcism

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Thread: Moffat Range requires excorcism

  1. #1

    Question Moffat Range requires excorcism

    So I have a Moffat range similar to the one in the photo on the website. Basic oven, glass top, no convection, no self cleaning, digital clock....

    http://www.comparance.com/Range/Moffat/MCBS585DRWW

    It might be 5 years old, we originally bought it for our cabin (where it worked perfectly FINE). Now I have brought it home and put it into a basement apartment in our our house.... and the horror begins.

    Upon bringing it home and plugging it in, the "oven cycle" light came on, but only faintly, and the clock didn't light up at all. All the elements DO turn on, but don't heat up anywhere near as hot as they should be, as I can almost lay my hand on the burners even after they've been turned on a few minutes.

    The oven is also behaving oddly, as when the bake function is selected, both top and bottom elements heat up, although the top element is red hot, and the lower element is slightly warm.

    So basically, everything (except the clock) does "sort of" work, but nothing works the way it should... I'm at a loss.

    Anyone know what could cause this? Maybe its something as simple as not plugged in all the way? Worse, could ANY of this be the fault of the wiring in the house? Not enough voltage/amperage? It does make me nervous thinking that this could be a fire waiting to happen. Note that the wiring for the stove was done about 15 years ago, but we've never had a stove there before.

    Thanks in advance
    Last edited by shadesofblonde; 01-27-2013 at 11:00 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Canada
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    Hi,

    -Sounds- like the power is hooked up incorrectly. Does the range have a cord plug? Can check the voltage at the outlet with a volt meter...

    Moffat Range requires excorcism-220voltrange-jpg

    Moffat Range requires excorcism-range_outlet-jpg

    Moffat Range requires excorcism-digital-multimeter-dm10t-01128792-jpg Digital Multimeter

    If your ranges power is hardwired ( no plug cord ) the meter readings should be 220-240 volts AC from black to red, 110-120 volts AC from red to white or black to white.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks Jeff

    The appliance is not hard wired... it has a plug in connection.
    Do you suppose the plug (from the wall) is wired wrong?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
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    Do you suppose the plug (from the wall) is wired wrong?
    That's what it sounds like so far.....if wired wrong things wont work, thing might work when something else is turned on, 240 volt elements will only get slightly warm is mis-wired and we only get 120 volts to them.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  5. #5

    Default

    That explains a WHOLE LOT! I bet thats what the problem is. So assuming the wiring at that location is incorrect, how do I fix it?? I can't be tearing off drywall and rewiring. Can it just be upgraded at the electrical panel? Although there is a range breaker at the panel... wonder if that actually connects to the range. Hmmmm

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Location
    Canada
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    Check it at the outlet receptical first...

    The most commonly used outlet receptacle for an Electric range and Dryer plug is an 4 wire outlet. This should help you tell what wire goes where when installing this receptacle.

    Look for the markings GND, W or white, X & Y on the back of the receptacle.

    Moffat Range requires excorcism-recepticalwiringhelp-jpg

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    414

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    Was there a range in this location before and did it work?

    If a new install,
    http://www.switchandoutletwiringmadeeasy.com/range/

    explains how it should be.

  8. #8

    Default

    The plug on the range is a 4 prong, (3 straight prongs and 1 round one)

    The receptacle is also for a 4 prong (3 straight prongs and 1 round one)

    The receptacle is not actually installed into the wall... there is a heavy white covered wire going to a yellow plastic junction box, and the wires split and are attached to the receptacle. It was wired 15 or so years ago and has just been sticking out of the wall all this time. From what I can see all the wires are (visibly) connected to the receptacle. I can't see the backside of the receptacle as its (mostly) tucked inside the junction box (does "mostly" sound bad?? lol)

    At the panel 2 breakers (40 amp? sorry I don't remember the amperage) are attached together and when the breaker is shut off the range does turn off... so that's good, yes??

    Although it would be very helpful if the panel was correctly labelled, as these breakers described above turn off the range, but are labelled something else.

    And no, there has never been a range at this location before. Its a separate suite in our house that was wired and plumbed years ago (by a real electrician and plumber) at the framing and drywall stage, but until now we had never actually put a kitchen in.
    Last edited by shadesofblonde; 01-29-2013 at 12:51 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    It was wired 15 or so years ago and has just been sticking out of the wall all this time. From what I can see all the wires are (visibly) connected to the receptacle. I can't see the backside of the receptacle as its (mostly) tucked inside the junction box (does "mostly" sound bad?? lol)
    Remove (shut off) power and inspect the back side to see where those wires go to.

    does "mostly" sound bad?? lol
    Yes.

    At the panel 2 breakers (40 amp? sorry I don't remember the amperage) are attached together and when the breaker is shut off the range does turn off... so that's good, yes??
    Yes.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    With a multimeter set to the voltage setting higher than 220 AC volts, breaker will have to be on for this test but be careful, make sure the probes handles that you hold are well insulated. The dual 40 amp range breaker, where the hot wires connect to it. should read 220 volts when each multimeter probe is in contact with each hot wire connection at the breaker (one probe on each hot). Should read 110 volts between each single hot and the panel ground or neutral bar. Certain ranges use 50 amp breakers but it is most likely a 40 amp.

    If the reading is not 220 volts between the 2 hots - like reading zero volts, then you may not be using a dual pole breaker or it is a faulty breaker.

    Now the dual pole breaker should have a red as one hot connection and a black on the other, unless it is old wiring. White wire to neutral bus of panel, green (or bare) to ground bus of panel. Make sure all 4 wires from range cable is connected where they should be at the panel. A loose neutral at the panel can also cause issues at the range.

    If that all checks out then we need to test the outlet at the range locations for proper voltage readings. In the event that checks out also then we have to check for any loose connections at the range end of the power cord and check readings there. Also although it may not cause your issue there should be no grounding jumper between neutral and frame if using a 4 wire system.

    At the panel 2 breakers (40 amp? sorry I don't remember the amperage) are attached together and when the breaker is shut off the range does turn off... so that's good, yes??
    The breaker is bridged (2 breakers molded into the same casing) but the 2 hot wires connect to separate connection lugs on the same dual pole dual breaker.
    Last edited by dkerr; 01-29-2013 at 01:38 PM.

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