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Timer rebuild

Timer rebuild

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Thread: Timer rebuild

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,465

    Default Timer rebuild

    Any comments on using solder to rebuild dryer contacts?

    Had a mechanical timer that was not drying. A, B, and C were supposed to close when in timed high heat mode. A and C did not close. Actually B was a big part of the problem. I got blades and contacts from a timer from a GE. The timer is question is an Estate dryer. These timers were the same in regards to the contact blades except the ge had two more blades where the timer motor was connnected. But the B was also a little burned and did not want to close with A and C like it should. I built the contacts up with solder and filed them down to shape them up like they should be and to make sure they would open.

    I did this with a washer once and finally sold it cheap with full disclosure. I used that washer several times after the "rebuild". I feel a dryer is a different situation.

    If arcing caused the solder to stick, the thermostats would cut the heat off, right?

    *I had first filed the burned contacts and bent the blade itself to make the dryer heat as it should, but was not confident it would hold up. I still have that blade I can put back in the timer. Which would you guys do? Niether?

    Any suggestions where new parts can be bought for rebuilding these timers?
    Last edited by Boman; 03-25-2015 at 07:28 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2,330

    Default

    Any suggestions where new parts can be bought for rebuilding these timers?
    None up here with me that I am aware of.

    Any comments on using solder to rebuild dryer contacts?
    Contacts may heat up from high current draw in the dryer....silver solder may help or pop rivits.

    Which would you guys do?
    Clean and adjust as a temperary repair....replace the timer as a permenent repair.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,465

    Default

    The solder I used did hold up. I tried to clesn it off as it was soft. Later I may try to find some silver solder that small. It is working.... for now. I am wondering about placing something non-conductive behind contact A or C to make it a little more stationary or a little closer to B so B can make better contact with it and the other contact when in Timed High Heat.

    I* I may have A and C confused right now as I do not have the timer disassembled in front of me. My thinking is if B contact is getting a little thin, the third contact needs to be a little closer with less flex. It is the outer most contact.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Canada
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    2,330

    Default

    The solder I used did hold up.
    The solder worked?

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    1,465

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff1 View Post
    The solder worked?

    jeff.
    Sorry, I meant to put 'did NOT' hold up. It is working now. I have used it a couple of times. Not sure if it will work for long as I feel maybe heat will takes tension out of one of the contact leafs and not let it make contact with the others like it should. That is why I was wondering about making the one a llittle more stationary. It is the outer most leaf away from the cams on that side and I see no reason for it to be as flexible as it is.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Canada
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    Default

    Sorry, I meant to put 'did NOT' hold up.
    Ok, gotcha.

    Timer rebuild-burnttimer-450-jpg

    We will have to get a better picture of the inside.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    1,465

    Default

    Looks like that picture is showing A,B, and C. A is the outer most contact leaf. B seems to be the one that is burnt the most on these timers. B has a double contact which lets it make contact with A and C. B and C seem to make up okay, but B gets burned down on the A side and this causes it not to make up with both A and C like it should in Timed dry. My thining is do place some kind of non conductive material behind A ( between it and the wall of the timer) to keep it closer to B and not allow it to flex back too far. This would keep it in position to make up with B while B is also in contact with C.

    Sound dangerous?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Canada
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    2,330

    Default

    Sound dangerous?
    No.
    Make sure the cool downs still work.

    jeff.
    http://www.applianceaid.com/
    Appliance Repair Aid

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